Tuesday, 18 December 2012

Road Safety Statistics for Cambridge City 2009-2011

WARNING: Before you start reading, this is a long post that deserves to be read in detail. If you just have a quick look you will likely miss a lot of the context.

Quick links to the tables below:

Casualty numbers.
Pedestrian and cyclist casualties, with other vehicles involved.
Percentage of casualties by light conditions.
Light conditions with street lighting.
Pedestrian and cyclist casualties by age.
Where were pedestrians when injured?
Where were pedestrians when injured? Vehicles and Severity.
Where were cyclists when injured ?
Where were cyclists when injured ? (A/B/C roads)
Where were cyclists when injured ? Vehicles and Severity.
Which roads are dangerous for cyclist and pedestrians ?
Which roads are dangerous for cyclist and pedestrians ? Junction detail.
Which junction features are dangerous for cyclists and pedestrians ?


Whenever I hear a debate about cyclists I hear a lot of anecdotal evidence, some of it plausible and some that is complete nonsense. I like to cut through that and explore objective information that has less bias. The best we have are the STATS19 reports filled in by the Police after collisions they attend.

STATS19 data is used in many sources, here are a few:

CambridgeshireCC Mapped Accident Data. [check Transport & Streets / Accidents ]
CycleStreets Collision Map and Reporting
DfT Road Accidents and Safety Statistics
DfT Road Collisions Map
Levenes Solicitors cycle accident map.
Raw Data for STATS19

Cambridge itself has a very different population to most of the UK, with 25% of commutes by bicycle and a large student population. Any campaign to improve safety needs to back this up with good data specific for this area.

All of the statistical results in this page are based upon STATS19 data 2009-2011 for Cambridge City. This excludes other Cambridgeshire districts such as South Cambs.  I chose a three year range as it is used by the council to score accident sites.

What is STATS19 ?

In short, it is the document filled in by the Police for accidents.  There is a lot of information and includes:

  • Location of accident: coordinates: road name(s), junction detail, footway etc.
  • Casualty information: how many, age range, sex, pedestrian or their vehicle(s).
  • Vehicles involved
The guide for filling in the STATS19 form is called STATS20.

Important information about STATS19:
  • Not all accidents make it into STATS19. It is only where the Police atttended or were informed after.
  • The data does not say who was at fault, only what casualties and vehicles were involved.
  • Contributary factors are not publicly available for each accident. The DfT have provided me with a document summarising contributary factors in Cambridge City 2009-2011. I have made this available via google docs until it can be hosted elsewhere.
Accident/Casualty Severity
  • Fatal: Death within 30 days of the accident.
  • Serious: An injury for which a person is detained in hospital as an “in-patient”, or any of the following injuries  whether or not they are detained in hospital: fractures, concussion, internal injuries, crushings, burns (excluding friction burns), severe cuts, severe general shock requiring medical treatment and injuries causing death 30 or more days after the accident. An injured casualty is recorded as seriously or slightly injured by the police on the basis of information available within a short time of the accident. This generally will not reflect the results of a medical examination, but may be influenced according to whether the casualty is hospitalised or not. Hospitalisation procedures will vary regionally". 
  • Slight: "An injury of a minor character such as a sprain (including neck whiplash injury), bruise or cut which are not judged to be severe, or slight shock requiring roadside attention. This definition includes injuries not requiring medical treatment".

Casualty numbers

The tables in this page focus on accidents where pedestrians and cyclists are involved. Not all accidents are listed, such as motorcycles. Car occupant casualties are shown for comparison.

casualtycasualty severitycount
Car occupantFatal2
Car occupantSerious19
Car occupantSlight348
CyclistFatal1
CyclistSerious79
CyclistSlight614
PedestrianFatal1
PedestrianSerious32
PedestrianSlight122

2011 Census data shows 31.9% of people who live in Cambridge commute by bicycle. Travel for Work which asks people who work in Cambridge, and therefore include residents living outside the city estimate 22-26% of commutes are by bicycle.

Pedestrian and Cyclist Casualties, with other vehicles involved. (no blame attributed)

casualtycasualty severityvehicle typecount
CyclistFatalTaxi/Private hire car1
CyclistSeriousCar52
CyclistSerious<null>9
CyclistSeriousVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under6
CyclistSeriousTaxi/Private hire car3
CyclistSeriousBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)3
CyclistSeriousPedal cycle2
CyclistSeriousGoods 7.5 tonnes mgw and over2
CyclistSeriousMotorcycle over 500cc2
CyclistSeriousMotorcycle 125cc and under1
CyclistSlightCar438
CyclistSlight<null>62
CyclistSlightVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under39
CyclistSlightTaxi/Private hire car30
CyclistSlightBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)28
CyclistSlightPedal cycle11
CyclistSlightGoods over 3.5t. and under 7.5t6
CyclistSlightGoods 7.5 tonnes mgw and over4
CyclistSlightOther vehicle3
CyclistSlightMotorcycle over 500cc2
CyclistSlightMinibus (8 - 16 passenger seats)1
CyclistSlightMotorcycle 125cc and under1
PedestrianFatalBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)1
PedestrianSeriousCar25
PedestrianSeriousPedal cycle3
PedestrianSeriousMotorcycle 50cc and under1
PedestrianSeriousTaxi/Private hire car1
PedestrianSeriousVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under1
PedestrianSeriousBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)1
PedestrianSerious<null>1
PedestrianSeriousGoods 7.5 tonnes mgw and over1
PedestrianSlightCar62
PedestrianSlightPedal cycle24
PedestrianSlightBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)13
PedestrianSlight<null>8
PedestrianSlightTaxi/Private hire car7
PedestrianSlightVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under6
PedestrianSlightGoods over 3.5t. and under 7.5t2
PedestrianSlightMotorcycle 50cc and under1
PedestrianSlightMotorcycle over 125cc and up to 500cc1
PedestrianSlightMotorcycle over 500cc1

The table above does not attribute fault but using other data sources we can infer some likelihood.


With adult cyclists, police found the driver solely responsible in about 60%-75% of all cases, and riders solely at fault 17%-25% of the time. (cites TRL research of data 2005-09)
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/dec/15/cycling-bike-accidents-study


DfT data tells us the largest contributary factor in collisions is 'failing to look properly'. For Cambridge City this amounts to 335 of 695 or 48% of accidents involving all vehicle types.

Another DfT document looked at two vehicle accidents and the blame is heavily skewed towards cars and LGVs. Source: 
RAS50014 Two vehicle accidents in which a driver or rider had "failed to look properly" as a contributory factor: GB 2011

Fault in each combination:

  • cycle 18% - 49% lgv
  • cycle 21% - 45% car
  • cycle 18% - 30% hgv
  • cycle 32% - 24% bus/coach
  • cycle 38% - 22% motorcycle




Percentage of casualties by light conditions:

casualtylightcountpercent
Car occupantDark132 36%
Car occupantDaylight23764%
CyclistDark173 25%
CyclistDaylight521 75%
PedestrianDark46 30%
PedestrianDaylight109 70%

It is surprising that cycling appears to be safer in the dark relative to walking or driving. This could be that people cycle less in the dark, or perhaps those without lights are taking greater care because of their vulnerability ?

I have a theory that unlit cyclists keep off the roads at night and cycle on pavements where they are away from the danger of motor vehicles.

The DfT Contributory Factors for Cambridge City 2009-2011, show:
  • Not displaying lights at night or in poor visibility. 8 of 695 accidents (all vehicle types).
  • Cyclist wearing dark clothing at night. 14 of 695. [this is not an offence]
The low percentages for cause agree with previous national TRL research summarised by the Guardian.

Light conditions with street lighting: 

casualtylightingcount
Car occupantDarkness - lighting unknown9
Car occupantDarkness - lights lit112
Car occupantDarkness - lights unlit4
Car occupantDarkness - no lighting7
Car occupantDaylight237
CyclistDarkness - lighting unknown19
CyclistDarkness - lights lit146
CyclistDarkness - lights unlit6
CyclistDarkness - no lighting2
CyclistDaylight521
PedestrianDarkness - lighting unknown4
PedestrianDarkness - lights lit39
PedestrianDarkness - lights unlit1
PedestrianDarkness - no lighting2
PedestrianDaylight109


Pedestrian and Cyclist Casualties by age.

Note: age brackets are different sizes. I have grouped together children under 15. The original data has 5yr brackets to 25, then 10yr brackets to 75.

casualtyage bandcount
Cyclist0-1554
Cyclist16-20106
Cyclist21-25130
Cyclist26 - 35161
Cyclist36 - 4591
Cyclist46 - 5572
Cyclist56 - 6543
Cyclist66 - 7512
CyclistOver 757
Cyclist<null>18
Pedestrian0-1526
Pedestrian16-2021
Pedestrian21-2524
Pedestrian26 - 3527
Pedestrian36 - 4519
Pedestrian46 - 557
Pedestrian56 - 6510
Pedestrian66 - 757
PedestrianOver 7512
Pedestrian<null>2

<null> means missing data.

The general casualty numbers in the first table already showed that cyclists are involved in more accidents. In this table we can see how young people are more affected. It is slightly surprising that the peak for both pedestrians and cyclists is 26-35, past what I consider a typical undergraduate and college age.

We can also see that casualty numbers for those 65+ are low in comparison.

The Guardian article also says for child riders, fault lay with them more than three-quarters of the time. This shows the importance of cycle training and providing cycle routes away from motor vehicles where they live and go to school.


Where were pedestrians when injured?

pedestrian locationcount
Crossing elsewhere within 50m. of pedestrian crossing12
Crossing in zig-zag approach lines2
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facility30
In carriageway, crossing elsewhere53
In carriageway, not crossing18
In centre of carriageway - not on refuge, island or central reservation7
On footway or verge28
On refuge, central island or central reservation1
Unknown or other9

Crossing the road is an obvious issue, but it is surprising that pedestrian crossings and footway/verge is an issue.

Where were pedestrians when injured? Vehicles and Severity.

Ordered by location, severity, count.

pedestrian locationvehicle typecasualty severitycount
Crossing elsewhere within 50m. of pedestrian crossingCarSerious5
Crossing elsewhere within 50m. of pedestrian crossingCarSlight4
Crossing elsewhere within 50m. of pedestrian crossing<null>Slight1
Crossing elsewhere within 50m. of pedestrian crossingTaxi/Private hire carSlight1
Crossing elsewhere within 50m. of pedestrian crossingPedal cycleSlight1
Crossing in zig-zag approach linesCarSerious1
Crossing in zig-zag approach lines<null>Slight1
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facilityCarSerious4
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facilityPedal cycleSerious1
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facility<null>Serious1
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facilityVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or underSerious1
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facilityCarSlight15
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facilityPedal cycleSlight5
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facilityMotorcycle over 500ccSlight1
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facility<null>Slight1
Crossing on pedestrian crossing facilityBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Slight1
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Fatal1
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereCarSerious6
In carriageway, crossing elsewherePedal cycleSerious2
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Serious1
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereMotorcycle 50cc and underSerious1
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereGoods 7.5 tonnes mgw and overSerious1
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereCarSlight21
In carriageway, crossing elsewherePedal cycleSlight9
In carriageway, crossing elsewhere<null>Slight3
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereTaxi/Private hire carSlight3
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or underSlight2
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Slight2
In carriageway, crossing elsewhereMotorcycle over 125cc and up to 500ccSlight1
In carriageway, not crossingTaxi/Private hire carSerious1
In carriageway, not crossingCarSerious1
In carriageway, not crossingCarSlight10
In carriageway, not crossingPedal cycleSlight3
In carriageway, not crossingVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or underSlight1
In carriageway, not crossingBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Slight1
In carriageway, not crossingTaxi/Private hire carSlight1
In centre of carriageway - not on refuge, island or central reservationCarSerious3
In centre of carriageway - not on refuge, island or central reservationCarSlight2
In centre of carriageway - not on refuge, island or central reservation<null>Slight1
In centre of carriageway - not on refuge, island or central reservationTaxi/Private hire carSlight1
On footway or vergeCarSerious4
On footway or vergePedal cycleSlight6
On footway or vergeCarSlight6
On footway or vergeBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Slight6
On footway or vergeVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or underSlight3
On footway or vergeMotorcycle 50cc and underSlight1
On footway or vergeTaxi/Private hire carSlight1
On footway or vergeGoods over 3.5t. and under 7.5tSlight1
On refuge, central island or central reservationBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Slight1
Unknown or otherCarSerious1
Unknown or otherCarSlight4
Unknown or otherBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)Slight2
Unknown or otherGoods over 3.5t. and under 7.5tSlight1
Unknown or other<null>Slight1

Typical complaints in Cambridge are:

1) Cyclists ignore traffic lights causing danger to pedestrians.
It appears that motor vehicles are implicated in 3.5 times the number of casualties:
'Crossing on a pedestrian crossing facility': 22 motor vehicle. 6 pedal cycles.
There are of course more motor vehicles on the road which results in an almost equal chance of an individual cyclist or motorist injuring a pedestrian at a pedestrian crossing.

2) Cyclists of pavements cause problems for pedestrians.
'On footway or verge': 22 motor vehicles, 6 pedal cycles. The 4 serious were by cars, the rest were slight.

Where were cyclists injured ?

vehicle location restricted lanecasualty severitycount
Bus laneSlight1
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)Serious7
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)Slight63
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)Serious5
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)Slight19
Footway (pavement)Serious3
Footway (pavement)Slight28
On lay-by or hard shoulderSlight1
On main c'way - not in restricted laneFatal1
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSerious65
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlight513

Raw numbers suggest cycle lanes are much safer than roads without. It is difficult to measure their effectiveness without knowing how many journeys were made in cycle lanes, or their length.


Where were cyclists injured ? (A/B/C roads)

This table limits the road classes to A, B, and C roads.  They will be the busy routes into the city and are far more likely to have cycle and bus lanes.

vehicle_location_restricted_lanecasualty_severitycount
Bus laneSlight1
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)Serious7
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)Slight57
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)Serious5
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)Slight17
Footway (pavement)Serious1
Footway (pavement)Slight21
On main c'way - not in restricted laneFatal1
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSerious48
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlight397



Where were cyclists injured ? Vehicles and Severity.


vehicle location restricted lanecasualty severityvehicle typecount
Bus laneSlightBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)1
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SeriousCar4
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)Serious<null>2
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SeriousVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under1
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SlightCar43
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)Slight<null>7
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SlightBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)7
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SlightVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under3
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SlightGoods over 3.5t. and under 7.5t1
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SlightPedal cycle1
Cycle lane (on main carriageway)SlightTaxi/Private hire car1
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)SeriousCar4
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)Serious<null>1
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)Slight<null>8
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)SlightCar8
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)SlightOther vehicle1
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)SlightPedal cycle1
Cycleway or shared use footway (not part of main carriageway)SlightVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under1
Footway (pavement)SeriousCar2
Footway (pavement)SeriousTaxi/Private hire car1
Footway (pavement)SlightCar21
Footway (pavement)SlightTaxi/Private hire car3
Footway (pavement)Slight<null>2
Footway (pavement)SlightPedal cycle1
Footway (pavement)SlightVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under1
On lay-by or hard shoulderSlightCar1
On main c'way - not in restricted laneFatalTaxi/Private hire car1
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousCar42
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSerious<null>6
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under5
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)3
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousMotorcycle over 500cc2
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousGoods 7.5 tonnes mgw and over2
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousTaxi/Private hire car2
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousPedal cycle2
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSeriousMotorcycle 125cc and under1
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightCar365
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlight<null>45
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightVan / Goods 3.5 tonnes mgw or under34
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightTaxi/Private hire car26
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightBus or coach (17 or more pass seats)20
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightPedal cycle8
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightGoods over 3.5t. and under 7.5t5
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightGoods 7.5 tonnes mgw and over4
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightOther vehicle2
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightMotorcycle over 500cc2
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightMinibus (8 - 16 passenger seats)1
On main c'way - not in restricted laneSlightMotorcycle 125cc and under1


Which roads are dangerous for cyclist and pedestrians ?

Note: The council have an more intelligent algorithm for calculating dangerous stretches of roads and accident cluster sites, based on road length and considers severities.

road class road num/namecount
U0498
AA1304 Outer Ring160
AA1307 Hunt/Hills/Bab99
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/East79
CMill Road68
CCherry Hinton Road49
AA1309 Milton Road47
AA1303 Madingley Road42
CTrumpington Street41
CNewmarket Road28
CVictoria Avenue23
CCastle Street20
BB1049 Histon Road19
CGreen End & Scotland Road19
CColdhams Lane18
CHigh Street, Cambridge17
CRegent Street16
CArbury Road12
C06
CKings Hedges Road6
CTennis Court Road ?6
CGilbert Road5
CBrooklands Ave4
A102
A13012
B10472
CGranchester Road2
CLime Kiln Road2
CGirton Road1
CHigh Street, Granchester1
CMaris Lane, Trumpington1
Motorway111


Which roads are dangerous for cyclist and pedestrians ? Junction detail.

Of our major routes, roundabouts on the A1304 Ring Road score badly.

road classroad num/namejunction detailcount
U0Not at junction or within 20 metres88
U0T or staggered junction70
AA1304 Outer RingRoundabout62
AA1307 Hunt/Hills/BabT or staggered junction43
AA1304 Outer RingT or staggered junction34
AA1304 Outer RingNot at junction or within 20 metres26
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/EastT or staggered junction26
CMill RoadT or staggered junction22
AA1307 Hunt/Hills/BabNot at junction or within 20 metres20
U0Private drive or entrance20
CTrumpington StreetT or staggered junction19
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/EastCrossroads18
CMill RoadCrossroads18
CMill RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres16
AA1303 Madingley RoadT or staggered junction15
AA1304 Outer RingPrivate drive or entrance15
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/EastNot at junction or within 20 metres13
CNewmarket RoadRoundabout13
AA1309 Milton RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres12
AA1309 Milton RoadT or staggered junction12
CCherry Hinton RoadT or staggered junction12
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/EastRoundabout10
CCherry Hinton RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres10
AA1307 Hunt/Hills/BabCrossroads9
BB1049 Histon RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres9
AA1307 Hunt/Hills/BabPrivate drive or entrance8
AA1309 Milton RoadPrivate drive or entrance8
CCastle StreetNot at junction or within 20 metres8
CTrumpington StreetNot at junction or within 20 metres8
CGreen End & Scotland RoadT or staggered junction7
CNewmarket RoadT or staggered junction7
CRegent StreetNot at junction or within 20 metres7
AA1304 Outer RingCrossroads6
BB1049 Histon RoadT or staggered junction6
CColdhams LaneT or staggered junction6
U0Crossroads6
U0Mini-roundabout6
AA1304 Outer RingMini-roundabout5
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/EastMini-roundabout5
CArbury RoadPrivate drive or entrance5
CCherry Hinton RoadCrossroads5
CGreen End & Scotland RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres5
CHigh Street, CambridgeNot at junction or within 20 metres5
CKings Hedges RoadT or staggered junction5
CVictoria AvenueNot at junction or within 20 metres5
AA1303 Madingley RoadCrossroads4
AA1309 Milton RoadCrossroads4
CArbury RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres4
CCastle StreetT or staggered junction4
CCherry Hinton RoadPrivate drive or entrance4
CColdhams LaneNot at junction or within 20 metres4
CHigh Street, CambridgeMini-roundabout4
CNewmarket RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres4
CRegent StreetT or staggered junction4
CVictoria AvenueT or staggered junction4
U0Roundabout4
U0Other junction3
A10Roundabout2
A1301Private drive or entrance2
AA1303 Madingley RoadPrivate drive or entrance2
AA1303 Madingley RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres2
B1047T or staggered junction2
CArbury RoadT or staggered junction2
CBrooklands AvePrivate drive or entrance2
CCastle StreetPrivate drive or entrance2
CGilbert RoadCrossroads2
CGreen End & Scotland RoadMini-roundabout2
CHigh Street, CambridgeT or staggered junction2
CTennis Court Road ?Crossroads2
AA1303 Madingley RoadOther junction1
AA1304 Outer RingOther junction1
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/EastOther junction1
AA603 Barton/FenC/Lensf/Gonv/EastMore than 4 arms (not roundabout)1
BB1049 Histon RoadPrivate drive or entrance1
BB1049 Histon RoadCrossroads1
CArbury RoadRoundabout1
CCastle StreetRoundabout1
CCherry Hinton RoadOther junction1
CColdhams LaneRoundabout1
CGilbert RoadT or staggered junction1
CGreen End & Scotland RoadRoundabout1
CGreen End & Scotland RoadPrivate drive or entrance1
CGreen End & Scotland RoadOther junction1
CHigh Street, CambridgePrivate drive or entrance1
CHigh Street, GranchesterT or staggered junction1
CKings Hedges RoadNot at junction or within 20 metres1
CMill RoadPrivate drive or entrance1
CNewmarket RoadCrossroads1
CTennis Court Road ?Private drive or entrance1
CTennis Court Road ?T or staggered junction1
CTrumpington StreetCrossroads1
CTrumpington StreetOther junction1
CTrumpington StreetPrivate drive or entrance1


Which junction features are dangerous for cyclists and pedestrians ?

junction detailcount
T or staggered junction305
Not at junction or within 20 metres247
Roundabout95
Crossroads77
Private drive or entrance74
Mini-roundabout22
Other junction9
More than 4 arms (not roundabout)1

It is not clear in the data which vehicle would be at the T, and which would be at a side road. The top result could be as a result of SMIDSY's (vehicle pulls out into path of cyclists they didn't spot).

The second result, not at a junction, is likely to be the result of overtaking cyclists. Close passing is a well cited problem amongst cyclists.

Conclusions

The statistics are quite clear. If you want to improve safety for cyclists, you should segregate from motor vehicles, or create safer junctions. If segregation is not possible, dealing with the following contributory factors would target 94% of all accidents for all road users:
  • Failed to look properly: 335 / 48%
  • Failed to judge other person’s path or speed: 126 / 18%
  • Poor turn or manoeuvre: 107 / 15%
  • Careless, reckless or in a hurry: 86 / 12%
Finding a way to crackdown on those rushing out of junctions without care and also close passing, again by people rushing would be the best way to reduce cycling casualties.

These are offences that require an officer to use their judgement before issuing a fixed penalty notice.

1 comment:

  1. Some really useful facts here! Thanks for posting.

    I found a really interesting infographic published by http://www.cycle-claims.co.uk regarding cycling accidents in the UK, statistics from 2013...

    http://visual.ly/cycling-accident-uk-facts-figures

    ReplyDelete